Family Research Council

Dads or Duds? Absent Fathers Leave a Lasting Mark


By Tony Perkins
June 14, 2013

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Inventing Father's Day took four presidents and a senator. But making a kid's day? All that takes is one committed dad. Hello, I'm Tony Perkins with the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C. A lot about families has changed since the first Father's Day in 1910. But one thing hasn't--and that's how important dads are. Not everyone is lucky enough to grow up with both parents, but a new study says daughters need their fathers more than ever. Girls whose dads were absent during the first five years of life are more likely, even than boys, to suffer from teen depression. The study in Psychological Medicine found a strong link--even after other factors were taken into account like social status, finances, family size, and mental illness. Without dads in their lives, researchers say girls have a harder time developing "emotional coping mechanisms." I know a lot of men are trying to get ahead in their careers, but it's studies like this that remind us: Fatherhood is the most important job a man can have.

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