Senate's Turn to Act on Pro-Life Legislation

Senate’s Turn to Act on Pro-Life Legislation

Last month the House passed the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, legislation that is essential to stopping late abortion. The vote coincided with the two-year anniversary of the conviction of infamous abortionist Dr. Kermit Gosnell, who was found guilty of killing late term babies who were alive outside the womb. These babies endured excruciating pain, the same pain they would have experienced had they been aborted inside the womb.

It’s now time for the Senate to take similar action in stopping these horrifically painful procedures. That’s why Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) has announced he will introduce the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act in the Senate this week. Passage of this bill would prevent late abortion nationwide at 20 weeks after fertilization, saving approximately 13,000 pain-capable babies from agonizing death every year.

Urge your Senators to cosponsor this critical bill! 

A strong majority of Americans are in favor of restricting abortion to the first trimester, but abortion is still legal in many states at any stage of development, and for any reason.

This is not up for debate. Medical experts have testified that unborn children can feel pain as early as 20 weeks after fertilization, which is about 4 and a half months. The fact is that anesthesia is given during prenatal surgery, precisely because scientists have come to realize that, as Dr. Kanwaljeet Anand testified before Congress:

"The human fetus possesses the ability to experience pain from 20 weeks gestation, if not earlier and the pain perceived by the fetus is possibly more intense than that perceived by term newborns or children."

Again, contact your Senators and urge them to cosponsor and support the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act.

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