Family Research Council

Family in the First Degree


By Tony Perkins
August 06, 2014

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Most colleges don't care about traditional values -- but if they want more students, they'd better start! Hello, I'm Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C. If you want to strengthen education, start by strengthening the family. In FRC's Mapping America, Dr. Pat Fagan explains that some kids have an academic edge: it's called married parents. Unlike their friends from fractured families, these students are a lot more likely to get their college degree. Thirty-six percent of kids who grew up in traditional families got their bachelor's compared to just 7% from single-parent homes. That's a pretty significant difference--and a predictable one. The U.S. Center for Marriage and Family says that every year a child spends with a single mom or step-parent "reduces [their] educational attainment by a half-year." Certainly a handicap can be overcome with determination, as a strong work ethic can make up for almost anything. But if you go by statistics, it's clear that growing up in a bachelor pad doesn't lead to bachelors' degrees!

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