LGBT activists to high-schoolers: Come into this private booth to talk about sex

LGBT activists to high-schoolers: Come into this private booth to talk about sex

By Cathy Ruse Senior Fellow and Director of Human Dignity


Cathy Ruse is Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Human Dignity at Family Research Council. This article appeared in Lifesite on August 20, 2018.


LGBT activists are nothing if not creative. Their latest approach involves inviting high school students into, in their words, a "big, gay booth" to talk about sex.

In a recent post on the blog of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the "Beyond Bullying Project" bragged about the success of its latest efforts going into Bay Area public high schools to entice students into private booths to talk about LGBT sexuality.

"Our pitch to would-be storytellers was open-ended," said the project organizers. "Tell a story about yourself, a friend, your family...the story does not even need to be true."

The project "collects" the stories on audio and videotape, and claims to have spent time in schools in North America, Australia, and New Zealand.

Apparently, participating schools welcome the rainbow-festooned booths, even directing their shop classes to build the "curricular, emotional space" for "queerness." Schools also invite project organizers to make presentations in class.

Bay Area students assisted in decorating the booths with rainbow paper, lights, boas, and chalk drawings. "Everywhere, it screamed gay," said the organizers.

Apparently, students "enjoyed the freedom" to leave class to visit the booth.

What an excellent use of education hours and tax dollars!

For some kids, skipping class was not motivation enough to enter the booth.

"The team recognized that approaching a big, gay booth might be a social risk for some students and teachers so we offered them alibis to account for their interest," the blog continued.

"Outside the booth ... we placed bowls of granola bars or chocolates, flyers announcing pizza lunches ... iTunes gift cards and an iPod touch that we would raffle off at the end of our two weeks at the school."

"For every story a student told, they received a raffle ticket for the iPod."

"Together, these incentives provided enough cover to allow storytellers to enter the booth without inviting too many questions about their interest."

Apparently, not all students were thrilled with the presence of the booth. Organizers admit that some "seemed to deliberately alter their path through the school so as to avoid meeting our invitations to step inside."

How difficult to be a student today, tossed about in a sea of cultural Marxism. My heart goes out to them. Now more than ever, they need the solid ground of strong families, strong faith, and strong friendship.